Injured People

ADF Abuse Compensation Process

For some former Australian Defence Force members the Defence Abuse Response Taskforce (DART) compensation assessment process is slow and complicated, often resulting in stress and confusion, writes military lawyer Brianna Tapscott.

For some former Australian Defence Force members the Defence Abuse Response Taskforce (DART) compensation assessment process is slow and complicated, often resulting in stress and confusion.

After launching the Defence Abuse Reparation Payment Scheme in March 2013, The Taskforce is now reportedly dealing with as many as 2,500 complaints, all with varying circumstances.

Many of the complainants are negotiating this scheme on their own, and are finding it difficult to complete the application and necessary paperwork. The response time varies, and in many cases extra information has been sought by the Taskforce some time after the application has been submitted.

This has caused extra pressure, especially for those who already have stress disorders as a result of exposure to abuse.

The most efficient and stress free way for a former ADF member to deal with the Taskforce is to seek the assistance of an experienced military compensation lawyer. Even though the notification period (May 2013) has passed, a lawyer is still able to help with the application and assessment process.

The lawyer will have a strong understanding of the paperwork, the information and detail that will be required, and the Taskforce communication procedures.

Instead of going it alone, a number of former ADF members from around Australia have sought advice from Tindall Gask Bentley Lawyers and have found it to be a weight off their shoulders.

It is important for these people to be able to focus on their health, instead of an assessment process.

Already, two TGB clients have been awarded the maximum $50,000 reparation.

For assistance with your Taskforce application or any other military compensation issue, contact your nearest TGB location.